Native Daughters of the Golden West

The Native Daughters of the Golden West is a fraternal and patriotic organization founded on the principles of Love of Home, Devotion to the Flag, Veneration of the Pioneers, Faith in the Existence of God.

Grace Parlor #242

 

Historical Landmarks

Native Daughters place commemorative markers on historic sites in an effort to install in future generations an appreciation of California's unique history.


Civic Participation


In 1850 California became the 31st State admitted to the Union. Each September 9th the Native Daughters of the Golden West participate in parades, picnics, and other commemorative events in their communities, reminding California's citizens about this important date in our history.


Education & Scholarship


Any member, son or daughter of a member, who is born in California may apply for a scholarship offered by the Native Daughters of the Golden West. Scholarships for any campus of the University of California or California State System are available, as well as for other accredited California universities, colleges, vocational or trade schools.


California Missions


The Mission Era of California may seem worlds away from our modern day skyscrapers. The Native Daughters have labored to help restore and preserve the beautiful monuments which are found in our twenty-one missions, creating learning centers for children and adults alike.


Children's Foundation


The future of our State lies in the hands of the children of California. Native Daughters assist children who have special medical needs that are beyond the family's means. By raising funds on a local level members make a positive difference in the lives of children from every corner of our State.


Environmental Issues


The protection and preservation of California's natural resources and its environment is our great concern. Members are involved in activities which promote recycling, energy awareness and water conservation. The coast is clean with help from the Native Daughters of the Golden West.

Native Daughters HOME in San Francisco, California

 

NDGW Home 

 

 

 

The Native Daughters of the Golden West Home is located at 555 Baker in San Francisco. This unique home is for members of the Order was first established in 1899. The current building was designed by Julia Morgan, whose other architectural accomplishments include design of the Hearst Castle. The cornerstone laying was held June 18, 1928, and the Home was formally dedicated on January 12, 1929. Enthusiastic members throughout the State contributed to a Loyalty Pledge Drive which realized sufficient funds to complete the mortgage, which was burned on August 12, 1932.

 

The Home is a four-story steel and concrete building. The first floor contains the Foyer, California Room, most of the historical exhibits and the Auditorium. The second story contains the Lounge, Dining Room, Kitchen and Court Garden, Rooms on the third and fourth floor furnish clean, comfortable accommodations for Native Daughters of the Golden West and their guests when visiting San Francisco. The Home is owned and supported by the Order of the Native Daughters of the Golden West and managed by the Home Committee. A full time, live-in Manager/Caretaker provides the maintenance of the Home and assists guests as needed.

A residential program was conducted by the Order until 1986, providing a secure, comfortable and friendly home for a great many sisters. Now, the Home houses the Grand Parlor Executive Officers, The Evelyn l. Carlson Historical Collection and the Pioneer Roster.

The Home is the official meeting place for several San Francisco Parlor luncheons, dinners and other social events are also held at the Home throughout the year. The Grand President is given a suite for her exclusive use during her term of office.

Members and their husbands and /or guests are invited to use the Home when visiting San Francisco.

$30 for members
$45 for non-members accompanied by a member

To make a room reservation: Call: (415) 921-2664 or (800) 994-NDGW [6349]
FAX: (415) 563-5230

Email: ndgw-home@sbcglobal.net
General Info: ndgwgpo@aol.com

 

Services Available

The following services are available to provide for your comfort while visiting and the Native Daughters of the Golden West Home:

1. The second floor kitchen facilities are available for use by overnight guests. It is requested that care be exercised in the use of the microwave and the coffee machines. If unfamiliar with use, please read instructions, and pull plug when not in use. Be sure to clean facilities after use.
2. Glasses and water pitchers are available in the pantry and may be taken to room. Guest refrigerator is available for storage of perishables and for ice from the ice machine.
3. Washing and ironing facilities are located in the basement laundry room. Please check with custodian regarding use.
4. The third floor lounge is available for TV viewing, reading and relaxation. Please consider other guests in residence with respect to volume.
5. A pay telephone is located in the second floor dining room for guest use.
6. Linen and soap are stored in bureau drawers. Additional supplies available from custodian. Upon leaving, notify custodian to replace room linen by stripping bed linens and leaving bed unmade.

Remember that this is your HOME. We ask that you treat it with as much care and respect as you would treat your own home. We trust that the Native Daughters of the Golden West Home and House Museum will continue to provide a comfortable place to visit for many years to come.

Interesting Facts about the Native Daughters Home:

The first home was a rented flat at 925 O'Farrell Street
Rules and regulations, NDGW Home, 1899 provided for room and conveniences for sick sisters ($2.00 per day for room/board for patient and nurse and medicine) and sleeping accommodations and meals for Sisters visiting San Francisco ($1.00 per day). Those in need were not turned away.

The second home was purchased by NDGW in 1903 at 1113 Hyde Street

Dr. Mariana Bertola became chairman of the Home Committee in 1906, a post she held for the next 47 years.

An adjoining house was purchased in 1924. Both houses were removed because it was too costly to join them.

Plans for a new home were designed by famous architect, Julia Morgan. They were approved at Grand Parlor in 1927.

It was originally projected that the new Home would cost $84,000 and be ready for use by September 1928. The cornerstone was laid June 18, 1928. The final cost was $91,000. The Home was dedicated in January of 1929.

There were 24 Sisters living at the Home in July 1929 paying $45.00 a month for room/board; Grand Parlor Office was on the first floor; and six parlors meet in two lodge rooms.

At Grand Parlor in 1929, GP Louise Heilbron presented the idea of a Loyalty Pledge: a voluntary contribution of $5.00 from every member which would liquidate the mortgage. The mortgage was burned on August 14, 1932, a real accomplishment during the years of the great depression.

The adjoining wing was added to the Home in 1965 using funds acquired through the sale of property deeded to NDGW by PGP Emma G. Foley. When the two buildings were joined, the auditorium and dining room were modified for access. Improvements in the auditorium were supported by funds bequeathed by PGP Bertha A. Briggs. The Emma Foley Wing and Bertha A. Briggs Auditorium were dedicated June 12, 1966.

In 1985 the Grand Parlor Office was moved from downtown to the Emma G Foley Wing of the Home.

The Residence Program was discontinued as of October 1, 1986, in part, due to an insufficient number of occupants and income to support the program, and the increased building maintenance cost. There were five occupants and four staff at that time. The monthly rate for a room and three meals a day was $375.00.

At present the ND Home is maintained as a House Museum with a Public Reference Library, NDGW meeting place, Grand Parlor Office, and guest rooms for Native Daughters and their guests. The fee is $25.00 a night for Sisters and $35.00 for their guests. 

Interesting Facts about the Native Daughters Home:

The first home was a rented flat at 925 O'Farrell Street
Rules and regulations, NDGW Home, 1899 provided for room and conveniences for sick sisters ($2.00 per day for room/board for patient and nurse and medicine) and sleeping accommodations and meals for Sisters visiting San Francisco ($1.00 per day). Those in need were not turned away.

The second home was purchased by NDGW in 1903 at 1113 Hyde Street

Dr. Mariana Bertola became chairman of the Home Committee in 1906, a post she held for the next 47 years.

An adjoining house was purchased in 1924. Both houses were removed because it was too costly to join them.

Plans for a new home were designed by famous architect, Julia Morgan. They were approved at Grand Parlor in 1927.

It was originally projected that the new Home would cost $84,000 and be ready for use by September 1928. The cornerstone was laid June 18, 1928. The final cost was $91,000. The Home was dedicated in January of 1929.

There were 24 Sisters living at the Home in July 1929 paying $45.00 a month for room/board; Grand Parlor Office was on the first floor; and six parlors meet in two lodge rooms.

At Grand Parlor in 1929, GP Louise Heilbron presented the idea of a Loyalty Pledge: a voluntary contribution of $5.00 from every member which would liquidate the mortgage. The mortgage was burned on August 14, 1932, a real accomplishment during the years of the great depression.

The adjoining wing was added to the Home in 1965 using funds acquired through the sale of property deeded to NDGW by PGP Emma G. Foley. When the two buildings were joined, the auditorium and dining room were modified for access. Improvements in the auditorium were supported by funds bequeathed by PGP Bertha A. Briggs. The Emma Foley Wing and Bertha A. Briggs Auditorium were dedicated June 12, 1966.

In 1985 the Grand Parlor Office was moved from downtown to the Emma G Foley Wing of the Home.

The Residence Program was discontinued as of October 1, 1986, in part, due to an insufficient number of occupants and income to support the program, and the increased building maintenance cost. There were five occupants and four staff at that time. The monthly rate for a room and three meals a day was $375.00.

At present the ND Home is maintained as a House Museum with a Public Reference Library, NDGW meeting place, Grand Parlor Office, and guest rooms for Native Daughters and their guests. The fee is $25.00 a night for Sisters and $35.00 for their guests. 

 

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